Significance of Strong Bones in Men

Osteoporosis, which is defined as “low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and a consequent increase in fracture risk,” currently affects more than 200 million people worldwide. This is caused by decreased bone mineral density or BMD which classifies osteoporosis, with a BMD T-score < -2.5, and osteopenia, with a BMD score between -1 and -2.5

Each year, more than 4.5 million people in the US and Europe will suffer a fragility fracture. Due to the growth of the aging population and the rise in life expectancy in recent years, the incidence of osteoporosis and related fracture is expected to increase, that’s where exercise, diet and supplements for men takes place..

Men and Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis affects more than two million men in the US and about 16 million more have reduced bone mass. Men account for about 40 percent of the nine million reported osteoporotic fractures that occur annually, and the likelihood of fracture in men 60 years of age and older is estimated to be as high as 25 percent. Osteoporosis affects more than two million men in the US and about 16 million more have reduced bone mass. Men account for about 40 percent of the nine million reported osteoporotic fractures that occur annually, and the likelihood of fracture in men 60 years of age and older is estimated to be as high as 25 percent.

Sedentary Lifestyle

Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for osteoporosis, so that physical activity favorably impacts bone health at any stage throughout the lifetime, although decreases in physical activity can contribute to bone loss. Cross-sectional and retrospective studies have demonstrated the physiological effects of teenage physical activity, and young adulthood continues in middle age and older adulthood. In addition to increasing BMD, bone loading increases bone size, cortical area and strength during adulthood and reduces the risk of hip fracture later in life.

Strength Training

The American College of Sports Medicine advises weight-bearing aerobic exercises, including those including running and jogging, three or five days a week, and strength activity two or three times a week to improve bone health through adulthood. The National Strength and Conditioning Association also suggests resistance training to enhance BMD or avoid age-associates. The Surgeon General’s Report on Bone Health also suggests rigorous resistance training for people who can handle high-impact exercise as well as routine jump training and involvement in weight bearing recreational activities.

In summary, the existing evidence shows that resistance training techniques in men with low bone mass are healthy and effectively increase BMD. Such findings have health effects, as exercising for some persons with poor bone mass may be the correct “prescription.”

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